Thursday, December 30, 2010

Fortune cookie say...

Welcome to my new occasional feature. Real rambles inspired by fortune cookies.



Actions do speak louder than... words...
and what are "talks" but many words shuttled to and fro...

It can be a daily task to decipher if words are truth, lies, or subtext. What is it we say about each other or ourselves and how much of that is true or perceived or blatantly false? In costuming we try to show what a person thinks of themselves or their job or their station in life through their clothes. Do clothes speak louder than words? Does posture?
What about the priorities we make? When we make time to pause and talk to each other, or help, or don't, what does that say about our priorities?
When there are no words, action is all that there is.
Does a lack of words speak louder than a lack of action?

3 comments:

BAREFOOT KANGAROO said...

What we say and what we do are the twin pillars of a life of integrity. Neither can be truly be elevated above the other. Both are load-bearing in their significance.People must speak the truth and live a life that agrees with those words. Silence is surrender and hipocrisy has the potential to undermine all that we preach. Actions do not truly speak louder than words, but words and actions carry the greatest force when they are in agreement with each another. Without words, actions can be a mystery. Without action, words are very hollow. They are twins and equal in weight.

al'xae said...

Nicely said Mr. Tate.

Kelly Visel said...

The observer of actions who does not ask questions of the actor often makes untrue assumptions. It's like the viewer of a painting who knows nothing of the painter; "That tissue," they might say, "is the physical representation of the painter's sorrow." When the painter was simply practicing techniques with shadow and light and used the nearest object as practice. Sometimes a tissue is simply a tissue, and the observer projects too much meaning on a meaningless object. In the same way, the actions of others can be misconstrued in the mind of the observer, but without confirmation from the mouth of the observed it's all theory.